Ann Schein

1951-2008 Beethoven Concertos

Robert Wyatt, Falmouth Enterprise, June, 2008

“The final portion of the program was dedicated to a single work, Beethoven’s epic Piano Concerto in E-flat Major…a masterwork of style, structure and content, generally thought to be one of the greatest concertos ever written. In the hands of Ann Schein, it glistened. Here is a pianist with the physical and emotional tools to craft any piece into an exquisite work of fine art, a person possessing the type of mind necessary to extract relationships from the score and translate them into  sonic contours. Residing within her, as well, is a temperament capable of producing myriad gradations of emotion. She exudes an old-world artistry of the rarest kind.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 5, “Emperor”
Stephen Simon Sinfonietta, Stephen Simon, Conductor; Falmouth Academy, Falmouth, Massachusetts

Baltimore Sun, March, 1984

“In what was one of the longest symphonic concerts in local musical history, a near capacity audience at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall heard all five of Beethoven’s Piano Concertos last night. Conducting the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was Leon Fleisher, and the host was John Houseman, actor and film, stage, and television producer…Each of the guest soloists, all women, was a nationally known artist…The highlight of the evening…was a performance of the No. 5 in E-flat Major, the Emperor by Ann Schein. A tremendously talented artist, she imparted a powerful grandeur that did not overshadow its more tender and gentle aspects. It was a wonderful performance in every respect and her audience went wild.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 5, “Emperor”
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Leon Fleisher, conductor

Day Thorpe, Washington Star, October, 1960

“It is true that Ann Schein is a Washingtonian, what is of more importance is that she is a musician…Her Emperor last night was a noble and powerful monarch…the slow movement of the concerto is always a test for the greatest pianism. Miss Schein was at her best in this heavenly cantabile, singing beautifully at first and fading into music’s most expressive arpeggios at the end.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 5, “Emperor”

Paul Hume, Washington Post, October, 1960

“Howard Mitchell presented as his soloist Ann Schein in the E-flat Major Emperor Concerto of Beethoven. Her reading…was in every aspect sound, of classic conception, touched with a sense of personal involvement but never leaving the area of solid, imposing structural lines that guide the sensitive player. Her approach to the opening movement was both noble and pliant. The slow movement was beautifully poised, singing with ease, and shaped with great care.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 5, “Emperor”

Baltimore Sun, March 2003

“Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4…provided an opportunity to savor the aristocratic gifts of pianist Ann Schein…colorful, poetic, assured.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 4
Concert Artists of Baltimore, Ed Polochick, conductor

Tim Page, Washington Post, September, 1996

“The star of the show was unquestionably the guest soloist, pianist Ann Schein, assured, temperate, imaginative, deeply poetic. One admired not only her technical command (the even pearly tonal luster, the seamless scales, the virtuosic fireworks that never seemed ostentatious) but also her deep understanding of a fathomless score.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 4
The Washington Chamber Orchestra, Stephen Simon, conductor

Washington Post, March, 1986

“Pianist Ann Schein radiates warmth, both personally and musically. Her performance of Beethoven’s Concerto no. 4 in G Major…was notable not only for its technical polish but for its expansive, full-bodied sound. Schein made one realize the gracious human qualities of this ever popular work.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 4
The Friday Morning Music Club Chamber Orchestra, Robert Gerle, conductor

Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, Australia, November, 1968

“In the highly competitive world of top international pianism, there are not many women. Among the few who have the formidable equipment and musical gifts to stand preeminent must be counted a young American pianist, Ann Schein, heard last night as soloist in a two-concerto program with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, She played the Fourth Concerto of Beethoven and the Rachmaninoff Third Concerto. From the opening chords of the Beethoven, it was evident that Miss Schein is not ashamed to be feminine. Her performance was full of delicate detail, gracefulness and affection. Miss Schein had power and vigor to spare for the Rachmaninoff and its big and brilliant moments, yet contrary to many a hard driving performance, the tension was relaxed for the luscious writing and coaxed with ease – a treatment which was rich and convincing.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 4

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; O Jornal, May, 1968

“Ann Schein gave us a Beethoven (4th Concerto) illuminated by great interior peace.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 4

Robert C. Marsh, Chicago Sun-Times, July, 1964

“Ravinia has described its new Sunday afternoon programs as ‘modern-minded music for young adults and the young-in-heart.’ The second (program) featured a Beethoven (First) Concerto with Ann Schein providing a…performance that showed she has fundamentally sound taste and lots of technique. Conductor Seiji Ozawa gave her a lovely accompaniment.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 1 in C Major
Chicago Symphony, Seiji Ozawa, conductor, Ravinia

Donal Henahan, Chicago Tribune, July, 1964

“If any doubt lingered that a potential audience existed for Sunday afternoon concerts at Ravinia, it should have been dispelled by the sight of 2,485 adults and children braving the chill winds to hear the Chicago Symphony play the second of its ‘Four O’Clock’ programs. Since the (emphasis) in these programs is on youth, the debut of Ann Schein under Ozawa’s baton was apropos. Miss Schein, nimble-fingered, has been moving into prominence among…pianists, and her competent way with Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto showed why. The lady plays with vigor, imagination and a good ensemble sense. We have heard many a less cohesive and less accurate performance downtown by male thunderers with twice Miss Schein’s experience.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 1 in C Major
Chicago Symphony, Seiji Ozawa, conductor, Ravinia

Glenn Dillard Gunn, Washington Times-Herald, June, 1951

“The most stimulating music of yesterday… at Roosevelt Auditorium with the Washington Civic Orchestra in their final concert of the season under Hendrik Essers, was contributed by the younger performers. The soloists were of professional caliber, although one of them is only 11 years old. She is Ann Schein, the piano prodigy whose recent recital evoked such generous measure of recognition. Her assignment…was the first movement of the Beethoven C Major Concerto, which she set forth with taste, flawless style and technical impeccability.”

Beethoven Concerto No. 1 in C Major
Washington Civic Orchestra, Hendrik Essers, conductor